Writing to Wake the Soul

Opening the Sacred Conversation Within

9781582704128 web
You are viewing: Paperback

ISBN: 9781582704128
Pages: 304
Dimensions: 5 1/2 x 8 3/8 inches

Writing to Wake the Soul

Opening the Sacred Conversation Within

Karen Hering

Winner of the 2014 Silver Nautilus Award

This is a book about words, but it’s equally about what pulses beneath them, what lies between the lines. It opens a path to the inner self and to the timeless wisdom deep within. By focusing on ten key spiritual words, Hering provides an elegant practice for readers to explore a greater intimacy with their spirituality, their soul, and their world.

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  • Published by Beyond Words/Atria on November 05, 2013. Available in: Paperback

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Book Description

In Writing to Wake the Soul, writer, teacher, and Unitarian-Universalist minister Karen Hering invites readers to awaken the “still, small voice within” through the spiritual practice of writing.

This is a book about words, but it’s equally about what pulses beneath them, what lies between the lines. It opens a path to the inner self and to the timeless wisdom deep within. By focusing on ten key spiritual words, Hering provides an elegant practice for readers to explore a greater intimacy with their spirituality, their soul, and their world.

Writing to Wake the Soul guides readers to discover their own relationship with language and spirituality through over 200 pages of writing prompts, meditations, examples, and simple exercises. Perfect for writers and non-writers, and for theists, atheists, and agnostics alike, this book offers readers an easy method to articulate and explore the difficult questions of our time.

Find the voice to express your greatest hopes, fears, dreams, and sorrows with Writing to Wake the Soul.



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Meet the Author

Karen Hering

Karen Hering is a writer and ordained Unitarian-Universalist minister. Her work has appeared in numerous periodicals and anthologies, the Star Tribune and Creative Transformation. She has led hundreds of writing sessions on numerous themes in congregations, community organizations, and workplace settings. She serves as a consulting literary minister in St. Paul, Minnesota and leads a literary ministry Faithful Words, which offers programs that engage writing as a spiritual practice and tool for social action.

Press Reviews

“Faith, Hering demonstrates, is a verb, and our faith in writing can lead to a trustworthy spiritual practice. Much gratitude to Hering for showing the way.”

Elizabeth Jarrett Andrew
author of Writing the Sacred Journey, Swinging on the Garden Gate, and On the Threshold

“In this powerful, lovely, practical, and provocative book, Karen Hering offers the world both a new form of ministry that transcends multiple traditional boundaries and profound evidence that the asking of unanswerable questions brings forth wide-open spiritual narratives of astonishing depth.”

Mary Farrell Bednarowski
Professor Emerita of Religious Studies, United Theological Seminary of the Twin Cities

“This is one of the best books ever written about the relationship between writing and spirituality. Karen Hering offers readers a wise and generous guide to mining essential material and transforming it into writing that is authentic and revelatory. Those who approach this book with open heart and mind will discover much about themselves.”

Bart Schneider
author of Blue Bossa and Beautiful Inez
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From the Beyond Words Blog

Using a Letter as a Prayer

Sitting in a waiting room one day while her child was undergoing outpatient surgery, my sister Susan endured the wait by writing me a letter. It was a time she would have prayed, she explained, but that wasn’t something she was accustomed to doing. So she wrote a letter instead, describing her feelings, naming her fears and hopes, seeking connection, crossing that vast stretch of waiting in which the minutes can drag on like hours. When the procedure was over, her child’s surgery a success, and her fears allayed, she signed off. The next day, she mailed the letter; but as I later read it, it seemed to be addressed well beyond me, sending its story out into the wind, releasing its hopes like a prayer wheel still in motion.


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